Education Outlook Breakfast Highlights College and Career Readiness Model

By: Lexi Smith, Communications Coordinator

BOA Luncheon-0186

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College and career readiness should be a major focus of school districts across the nation. J.D. Hoye, President of the National Academy Foundation (NAF), spoke about this issue at our Education Outlook Breakfast on Aug. 28.

The Education Outlook Breakfast brought educators and the business community together to discuss the NAF model that includes “industry-focused curricula, work-based learning experiences, and business partner expertise.” According to J.D. Hoye, instructional practice, robust partnerships with industry, and a strong advisory board are essential for success.

The program focuses on five key themes, including finance, hospitality and tourism, information technology, engineering, and health sciences. Dallas ISD has 3,613 students in the NAF program and 28 academies with all five fully developed themes. About 10 percent of Dallas ISD high school students are in NAF academies. Students from Dallas ISD’s Kimball High School, a nationally distinguished NAF academy, attended the breakfast and spoke about their own experiences in the NAF program.

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Congressional Forum Sparks Discussion Over Federal Level Issues

By: Lexi Smith, Communications Coordinator

North Texas Congressional leaders took the stage on Tuesday to discuss issues impacting our region at the federal level.

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The 2014 Congressional Forum featured Congressmen Ralph Hall, Pete Sessions, and Jeb Hensarling. Moderator Brad Watson, Luminant’s Senior Director of Corporate Communications, covered various topics including healthcare, the Export-Import Bank, and possible candidates for the House Majority Leader.

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Infographic of the Week: Financial Services

By: Ryan Tharp, Director of Research and Economic Development

Since 2010, the Dallas-Fort Worth area has added approximately 21,000 jobs in the Financial Services industry. Some of the largest gains have occurred within specific sub-industries such as Insurance Agencies and Brokerages, Commercial Banking, Sales Financing, Direct Life Insurance Carriers, and Investment Advisors. Though only accounting for 6.2 percent of the total workforce, the 10,500 financial establishments located here service clients from around the world.

The U.S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing produces U.S. currency at its facility in Fort Worth and the Federal Reserve Bank of the 11th District is headquartered in Dallas. The many financial firms that call DFW home are distributed across the entire region, however the largest clustering is centered in the urban cores of Fort Worth and Dallas as well the cities of Addison and Plano. Major employers such as JPMorgan Chase, Comerica, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, Citigroup and others employ hundreds of people throughout the area.

IndustryClusters - Financial - 118-119

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How Education Affects Workforce

By: The DRC Education Team

Why should the business community be interested in ensuring a strong education system from PreK through post-secondary work? To have a skilled and talented workforce, we must educate students to address the changing demands of industry. Businesses are the most aware of what skills they need today and predicting the skills they will need in the future. Our education system must meet the demands of preparing students for jobs today and 20 years from now. Continue reading

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Internship Wrap-Up

By: Anna Beth Gruber, Intern, Communications

For those of you keeping score at home, you may remember my “Meet the Interns” blog post from earlier in the summer. In that post, I introduced the latest team of interns at the DRC, myself included, and shared many of our enlightening thoughts on the DRC, our hobbies, and most importantly –deserted islands. It’s hard to believe that was almost two months ago, and I am now finishing my final week at the DRC, and all of our other fabulous interns have already left.

With my time at the DRC coming to a close, impending senior year at the University of Denver, and that notorious job search quickly approaching, I wanted to give an overview of my time at the DRC and what my experience here was like. I was instructed to keep my thoughts to “fewer pages than Moby Dick,” so instead I decided to simply leave the DRC community, and all future interns, with a few final thoughts and impressions the DRC has left me, and some of our other interns, with.

  1. They don’t bite, I promise!

This is the friendliest staff I think I have ever worked with, everyone seems to always be smiling here, I think it’s because they really like the work they are doing at the DRC. Not only is everyone willing to go above and beyond to help a member of the DRC, but also they’re a great staff to work with, are quick to help each other out, and are always good for a laugh or a quick coffee pick-me-up (I’m looking at you Comms). You’ll always have the chance at the DRC to talk to amazing people, whether it’s within the DRC staff itself or someone you meet at an event, listen to what they have to say, and ask them about their experiences with the DRC or about their experiences within the Dallas business community. The people you meet through the DRC are willing to give you advice on pretty much anything, from resume tips, to how you should dress for an interview. As our Research Intern, Colin, put it “There are all sorts of different people, both at the DRC and through its members/connections, which we get to interact with; make sure to make the most of all those meeting opportunities, as you never know who you’ll meet or what you’ll hear that will change your life.”

  1. Come hungry.

Yes, I do mean literally. This place is ALWAYS feeding you; it’s ridiculous (Breadwinners for days!). But, I also mean this figuratively, in the sense that you should come to the DRC with an appetite to learn. The DRC staff is full of knowledge on the Dallas region, (about which I could probably write a whole second blog), and even if you’re a native to this area, such as myself, you’ll learn so much about the different parts of this region – a lot of which you may discover you never even knew about – the people and businesses who contribute and are invested in its continued success (which, I may add, includes the DRC team), and so much more. If you work hard and take everything from this internship as a learning experience, you’re going to walk away from your time at the DRC with not only an expansive knowledge of the region, but also a new understanding of so many different aspects of what makes a business function successfully on a day-to-day basis, both behind the scenes, and in the front lines, and many tips on what you can and should do to be a successful person in the business world. (Editor’s note: thank you Trisha, our economic development intern, for that little piece of advice!)

  1. Keep an open mind, and open ears!

If you keep this piece of advice in mind, and adhere to it, you never know what you’ll learn, or who you’ll meet at the DRC. There are so many opportunities to not only grow and learn as a person, but also to expand your network while you’re at the DRC, so don’t be afraid to get a running start, and insert yourself into any opportunities that may arise, because, like I said, you’ll never know who you’ll meet. Pro-tip: the member engagement team at the DRC hosts a crazy amount of networking events, so volunteer to help at one of them, you’ll win brownie points with the member engagement team, and it’s a great opportunity to meet and network with people you might otherwise never have the chance to. At one of our speed networking events this summer, Anthony, our Member Services intern, jumped right into the mix to take advantage of the opportunity. He came away with a lot of new connections, and with a new and improved “elevator speech.”

In order to keep to my allotted word limit, I will stop myself here, although I could go on and on about the numerous opportunities that the DRC has given me, and how great this staff is. I wanted to wrap up my thoughts by saying “thank you” to everyone on the DRC team, this has been one of greatest summer internships I’ve had, and I really don’t want to leave, and there’s a good possibility that I may not. Everyone was so welcoming and quick to help me with whatever I needed, and I have learned so much in the few months that I have been here. If you ever get a chance to work with this wonderful team at the Dallas Regional Chamber, you should count yourself lucky. It is full of great people, who love what they do, and are truly invested in making the Dallas region the best that it can be.

If you’re interested in interning at the Dallas Regional Chamber, be sure to check out our different positions

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True Patriot and Public Servant Congressman Ralph Hall to be Honored

By: Erica Mulder, Director of Public Policy

RMHAllAt 91-years-old Congressman Ralph Hall has a history not comparable to many.  He’s the oldest serving member of Congress and the oldest person to ever serve in the U.S House. At 89, he joined the Twitter-verse, went skydiving, and still laces up his running shoes for a two-mile jog every morning.  There’s an airport and a parkway in Rockwall named after him, and soon a lake that will also bear his name.  But that recognition doesn’t come without a lifetime of dedication and hard work. Continue reading

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Infographic of the Week: Market Tapestry

By: Ryan Tharp, Director of Research and Economic Development

Companies, agencies, and organizations often measure and predict consumer purchasing habits. Segmenting markets allows businesses to target specific audiences and potentially have a more direct effect on behaviors.

Esri’s Tapestry Segmentation system highlights the “who” of lifestyle demography with the “where” of local neighborhood geography to create a model of various lifestyle classifications or segments of actual neighborhoods with addresses—distinct behavioral market segments. To create this map, U.S. residential areas are divided into 65 distinctive segments based on socioeconomic and demographic characteristics to provide an accurate, detailed description of U.S. neighborhoods. These segments are then grouped into the 12 Tapestry Segmentation LifeMode Summary Groups, which are characterized by lifestyle and lifestage, and share an experience such as being born in the same time period or a trait such as affluence.

The tapestry map most certainly does not categorize every person living in these areas, and it is not intended to misrepresent any one area. This fun map does however highlight where some of these summary consumer and lifestyle groups are located. When we look at lifestyle and lifestage groups, birds of a feather generally do flock together.

Market-Tapestry-Infographic

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